The following is a collection of information from internet that you may find interesting and useful. It is based on an article at https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/daily/regimen/5-ways-to-care-for-feet.htm

Your Feet

Your feet are probably the last part of your body you think about — until they start hurting. They’re too important to overlook, though: With some 26 bones and a complex framework of muscles, tendons and ligaments, your feet absorb the impact of your full body weight with every step, keeping you balanced and upright in the process.

The problems that can afflict your feet are numerous. Foot odour, cracked skin, fallen arches, corns, ingrown toenails, fungal infections and even damaged bones can cause discomfort and reduced mobility. While some of these problems are congenital, you can avoid many of them with a little TLC. If that wasn’t enough of an incentive, all of these problems tend to worsen as we age, so if foot care doesn’t seem important now, it will be.

The best way to keep your feet healthy is a simple regimen of daily care that will help keep the skin, bones and muscles of your feet functioning properly.

Wear comfortable shoes (just like your mother told you)

Wearing the wrong shoes can affect many aspects of foot health. First, your shoes must fit. Shoes that fit too tightly can cause hammer toe, corns, ingrown toenails and general foot pain. Overly large shoes prevent your heel from settling in the proper place as you walk, causing blisters and calluses, sore heels and excessive shoe wear. Remember that your feet “stretch out” late in the day, so go shoe shopping after work, when your feet are at their largest. You might gain a half size as you age as well, so your usual size from 10 years ago might not be your correct size today.

Some shoes are bad for your feet even if they fit properly. Wearing high heels frequently can cause damage to the bones of the foot. They’re fine every once in a while, but you should find a comfortable pair of flat-soled sneakers for everyday wear.

You should also look for the right materials. Synthetics tend not to breathe well, trapping heat and moisture. Natural materials like leather and cotton will keep your feet cooler and release moisture; athletic shoes with special materials or mesh work even better. At the same time, though, you can’t really avoid foot sweat. However, you can try to alternate your shoes, so that the pair you wore yesterday has a chance to dry out completely before you wear them again.

If you have smelly shoes to deal with there is a shoe steriliser called Steri Shoe which uses intense UV light to sterilise the inside of shoes. Those of you with a have fungal nail infection it is a good idea use this on your shoes as helps prevent getting re-infected.

Take a walk

This might seem counterintuitive, since walking puts stress on your feet. The muscles in your feet are just like any other muscles – they need exercise to stay strong. You can’t really lift weights with your foot muscles, so the best way to exercise them is to just take a walk. It doesn’t have to be a long walk, but taking one every day will keep those muscles firm and keep your tendons and ligaments flexible. That can prevent fallen arches later in life. If you have a dog, it will thank you for it.

If walking causes sore legs or feet, there are a couple of extra steps you can take to improve the problem. Arch support inserts can keep your feet in the proper position to support your weight during walking. Many stores have special measurement devices that will tell you which type of support is right for your foot. If you’ve been doing a lot of walking on pavement, your feet might not be up to the impact. Try walking on grass.

Of course, make sure you wear those breathable, well-fitted shoes when you walk.

Wash your feet

Even the most conscientious and clean person among us skips washing his or her feet in the shower every now and then. It can be a pain. It’s really important to the health of your feet, though.

Your feet spend most of every day trapped inside a pair of shoes. All the moisture and sweat provides fertile ground for bacteria to grow, and the spaces between your toes are even more hospitable for bacteria and fungi. When you don’t wash your feet, you’re letting that stuff accumulate from day to day. That leads to unpleasant foot odour — and eventually to fungal infections and other skin problems.

You don’t need a special foot wash to clean your feet. Just make sure you give them a thorough soaping, especially between your toes. After your shower, it’s equally important to dry your feet (between the toes again) to prevent trapped moisture from letting all that bacteria hang around. Foot powder can keep them dryer longer, too.

Moisturise

Moisturising your feet seems to contradict everything we’ve told you about keeping your feet dry. Why would you add extra moisture? The wear and tear endured by your feet each day can result in areas of dry, cracked or scaly skin. If you live in a warm, sunny climate and wear sandals frequently, this problem may be significantly worse.

The cure is simple. Rub a lotion containing cocoa butter (a natural emollient) into the skin of your feet every day. You can do this in the morning, although it’s recommended you skip the area between your toes. However, if you have serious scaling or dry skin issues on your feet, you may want to try an overnight moisturising routine. Simply coat your feet in cocoa butter, then put on a comfortable pair of cotton socks. The socks will hold the cocoa butter against your skin and keep it from getting all over your sheets. In the morning, the skin on your feet will be much softer.

Socks

The best socks to wear are ones that wick the sweat away from your skin. Natural fibres rather than synthetic ones are more effective at doing this. Now on the market are bamboo socks which, in addition to being very good at wicking the sweat away, have anti-microbial properties. This means that they tend to not get as smelly and are reputed to help with control of foot infections.

It goes without saying that changing your socks every day is an important part of foot hygiene and if you have a fungal infection such as athletes foot or a fungal nail infection, using a hot wash (60°) and a disinfectant (that can be purchased from supermarkets) is advisable.